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Biblical Rest: Shabbat and Shalom

When I think of rest, the first thought that comes to mind is God’s Sabbath’s rest following the six days of Creation (Gen 2:2-3). In similar manner, Yeshua also demonstrated the need for physical and spiritual rest when He declared Himself the Lord of the Sabbath (Matt 12:8). Contrary to the western mindset, Hebraic tradition views rest differently than mere relaxation. Indeed, it carries with it the concept of shalom, which speaks of the peace of God that passes all understanding (Php 4:7).

Webster defines peace as freedom from war or a cessation of war, a treaty to avoid or end war, public security, freedom from public disturbance, law and order, harmony, absence of mental conflict, serenity, calm, quite, tranquility. The Hebraic concept of peace, however, takes the term to the next level, revealing even greater blessings.

Shalom be with you” was a common greeting among the Israelites, also meaning “hello” or “good bye.” The Hebrew definition of shalom signifies not only peace and rest, but well being, good health, welfare, security, and contentment, invoking the wholeness of body, mind, soul, and spirit, and the complete absence of agitation and stress. When a Jew blessed a fellow Jew with peace, he was blessed indeed! Such was the blessing Yeshua imparted to His disciples when He appeared to them after the Resurrection.

So when it was evening on that day, the first day of the week, and when the doors were shut where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood in their midst and said to them, “Peace be with you.” – John 20:19

The term shalom derives from the verbal root shalom meaning to be complete, perfect and full. Shulam, a passive form of the verb shalom, means to be fully paid, the reconciled one, the one restored to peace and happiness.  For example, the Shulamite girl was reconciled, restored to peace, favor, and contentment:

So when it was evening on that day, the first day of the week, and when the doors were shut where the disciples were, for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood in their midst and said to them, “Peace be with you.” – John 20:19

The term shalom derives from the verbal root shalom meaning to be complete, perfect and full. Shulam, a passive form of the verb shalom, means to be fully paid, the reconciled one, the one restored to peace and happiness.  For example, the Shulamite girl was reconciled, restored to peace, favor, and contentment:

“Then was I in his eyes, as one who has found [discovered] favor [shalom] – SS 8:10.

The name “Solomon,” the object of the Shulamite girl’s affections, is closely related to the name “Shulamite.” Both terms are rooted in shalom, God’s perfect peace. “Solomon” means the peaceful oneorthe peace provider.  The Shulamite girl, a prophetic image of the Bride of Christ, is the bearer of peace, while Solomon, a type of the heavenly Bridegroom, is the source of peace in the bride’s life. In other words, Yeshua is Sar Shalom, the Prince of Peace, and His bride is the daughter of peace. May the priestly blessing of Shabbat and shalom be upon you and yours now and forever.

The LORD bless you, and keep you; the LORD make His face shine on you, And be gracious to you; the LORD lift up His countenance on you, and give youpeace. – Nu 6:24-26

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