📄 Hebraic Roots and Patterns


by Dr. Dinah Dye

The first time we see the word “saved” or “yashah” is in the story of Cain and Abel. Christians speak of “being saved,” but what does that really mean from a Hebraic perspective? The first clue in this passage is the time frame that emerges from the story. The phrase, “mikketz yamim,” means “at the end of days.” 

Scripture tells us that Abel brought himself, as well as an offering that was the firstborn of his flock. The passage also says, in Hebrew, that God “saved” or “rescued” Abel and his offering, but He did not “save” Cain and his offering. The word for saved is “yashah” and here it is most often translated as God turned to, or God accepted, not God saved Abel’s offering. 

The two-letter root of the word for saved is “shah” which means “watch” or “shepherd.” The shepherd, then, watches over the flock on the lookout for danger so when an enemy attacks, the shepherd destroys him. A variation of the word is the name of the Messiah, which is Yeshua

Perhaps Abel is a picture of the Messiah, and Cain a picture of the enemy. At the end of days God will rescue Abel and his sheep, who are the people of God, and He will destroy the predator. So, although the enemy of men’s souls has come to steal, kill and destroy the Messiah and his flock, God promises He will rescue and “save” them from that enemy at the end of days.

Christians speak of “being saved,” but what does that really mean from a Hebraic perspective?

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Dr. Dinah Dye’s passion is to help believers learn to study and research the Hebrew roots of Christianity for themselves and to begin to incorporate the prayer services into their personal lives.

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